Hunter Cole’s work as an artist is bold and goes places where others haven’t. She derives her inspiration for her artwork (usually showcased as abstractions, digital art and installations) through her PhD studies in Genetics in the USA.

Malaria Resistance oil and acrylic on canvas 40 x 30 in. Taken from Hunter Cole's website for illustration purposes only. http://www.huntercole.org/artgallery/biologypaintings/malariaresistance.html

Malaria Resistance oil and acrylic on canvas 40 x 30 in. Taken from Hunter Cole's website for illustration purposes only. http://www.huntercole.org/artgallery/biologypaintings/malariaresistance.html

 

She is a perfect example of how a scientist can use the modern strides of biotechnology to experiment with viruses and bacteria that are harmful to us and create works of art that really strike the heart (and I don’t mean in the form of a heart illness). The Digital and Neon Art where she says ‘viruses are beautiful‘ is particularly striking as you will see in the photos below (borrowed from her website for illustration purposes only).

From The Art of Death, depicting Herpes virus. Photos from http://www.huntercole.org/artgallery/neonart/virusesarebeautifulneon.html

From The Art of Death, depicting Herpes virus. Photos from http://www.huntercole.org/artgallery/neonart/virusesarebeautifulneon.html

 

From The Art of Death, depicting Influenza virus. Photos from http://www.huntercole.org/artgallery/neonart/virusesarebeautifulneon.html

From The Art of Death, depicting Influenza virus. Photos from http://www.huntercole.org/artgallery/neonart/virusesarebeautifulneon.html

 

From The Art of Death, depicting the HIV virus. Photos from http://www.huntercole.org/artgallery/neonart/virusesarebeautifulneon.html

From The Art of Death, depicting the HIV virus. Photos from http://www.huntercole.org/artgallery/neonart/virusesarebeautifulneon.html

 

Cole seeks to see only good things  – her controversial art installation called radioactive biohazard aims to depict various aspects of genetics, such as stem cell research and cloning, in art forms. It is only possible to arrive at such artwork, from a scientist’s walk of life and journey heavily steeped in science, research and ongoing scientific studies. As if this is not impressive enough, Cole has created music (or midi files to be specific) out of lux genes which produce proteins that cause bacteria bioluminescence. More about the actual technique of how Cole did this is on her bioluminiscence music webpage.

This music is embedded below, but you can browse through Cole’s youtube channel which is a wealth of information for those interested in integrating science and art.

Cole teaches biology and has put together a course called ‘Biology through Art’ which, if I lived in the USA, I would definitely take part in.

 

 

And here questions of type such if honestly strike me not much as I wrote everything higher. It is visible you simply you don’t want to read all this. As my parrot does.