US based Lisa Nilsson, a talented artist with an incredible amount of patience and great attention to detail, uses narrow strips of paper rolled and shaped into art pieces. This art technique, called quilling, is becoming quite popular in the UAE and the Middle East. I have previously written on this technique in magazines. The interesting aspect is that Lisa used quilling in her ‘Tissue Series’ where she crated human anatomy cross sections using Japanese mulberry paper and the gilded edges of old books. Mulberry paper was chosen for its strength, flexibility and variety of colours. Each art piece takes weeks to finish, and is usually created using an actual photograph.
Photo and text © Lisa Nilsson. Transverse Head-Tongue (detail) 2013 A detail of Transverse Head-Tongue showing the tongue, bottom teeth and tonsils. Abdomen (detail)

Photo and text © Lisa Nilsson. Transverse Head-Tongue (detail) 2013 A detail of Transverse Head-Tongue showing the tongue, bottom teeth and tonsils. Abdomen (detail)

Photo and Text © Lisa Nilsson. 2011 A detail of Abdomen showing the spinal cord within a gold vertebra.

Photo & Text, © Lisa Nilsson. Head and Torso 2010 mulberry paper 9 x 13 x 1 inches

A graduate in BFA Illustration and McCann Technical School’s medical assisting program, Lisa loves how asymmetrical the body looks in cross section.  The quote found on her website states, “We are so symmetrical on the outside and so asymmetrical on the inside and everything inside fits so perfectly…This is the connection I made to quilling. Rolled pieces of paper are amenable to being squeezed, shaped and shifted to fill a space.”

Photo and Text © Lisa Nilsson. 2011 A detail of Abdomen showing the spinal cord within a gold vertebra.

Photo and Text © Lisa Nilsson. 2011 A detail of Abdomen showing the spinal cord within a gold vertebra.

Lisa likes to think of her work as objects rather than images. That is why she exhibits lateral sections lying flat and the vertical ones standing upright. The quilled arts pieces are displayed in handmade silk-covered wooden boxes. The “Tissue Series” was exhibited at Lavender Door Gallery, in Massachusetts, and will be exhibited at the PavelZoubok Gallery in New York soon.

Read more on the ‘Tissue Series’ by Lisa Nilsson on This is Colossal and the Huffington Post.